Current Courses → Approved Theory And Practice Courses

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Fall 2018

Approved Theory and Practice courses
Note: students who enroll in one of these courses cannot count the course as part of their Upper Division Course of Study Requirement.

Demography 160 Special Topics in Demography
  • Wednesday 2-4PM
  • Lawton
  • EVANS 65
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 25584

This class is ideal for students considering graduate school or policy work. You will learn how to identify an academic research topic that is meaningful and interesting to you. Acceptable projects will be interdisciplinary topics in the area of demography, family, labor, health, aging, and related topics. In this course, students will engage with the material by identifying the topic, formulating a question, conducting a literature review, selecting a data source, learning how to analyze the data, interpret and present the results, and discuss the implications of the findings. Students will present their research at the end of the semester. Students are encouraged to 'pair' this course with another substantive course such as Demog C126 (Sex, Death, and Data), Family Sociology (Soc 111AC), and many others. This class can also be preparation for an honors thesis or mentored research with faculty. Prerequisites: introduction to statistics, intro to sociology or economics, upper division status.

Economics C 110 Game Theory in the Social Sciences
  • TTH 9:30-11 AM
  • Powell
  • Haas Faculty Wing F295
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 21226

A non-technical introduction to game theory. Basic principles and models of interaction among players, with a strong emphasis on applications to political science, economics, and other social sciences.

Also taught as POLISCI C135.

 

Energy and Resources Group C 100 Energy and Society
  • TTH 2-3:30
  • Kammen
  • Haas Faculty Wing F295
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 26243

Energy sources, uses, and impacts: an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy in international perspective, origins, and character of the energy crisis.

ESPM 155 AC Sociology and Political Ecology of Agro-Food Systems
  • TTH 2-3:30
  • De Master
  • Hearst Field Annex A1
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 26685

Sociology and political ecology of agro-food systems; explores the nexus of agriculture, society, the environment; analysis of agro-food systems and social and environmental movements; examination of alternative agricultural initiatives--(i.e. fair trade, food justice/food sovereignty, organic farming, urban agriculture).

History C 182 C Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society
  • MW 5-6:30
  • Carson
  • Dwinelle 145
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31147

This course provides an overview of the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) as a way to study how our knowledge and technology shape and are shaped by social, political, historical, economic, and other factors. We will learn key concepts of the field (e.g., how technologies are understood and used differently in different communities) and apply them to a wide range of topics, including geography, history, environmental and information science, and others. Questions this course will address include: how are scientific facts constructed? How are values embedded in technical systems?

History C 187 The History and Practice of Human Rights
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Hoffman
  • Leconte 4
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31149

A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the evolution of human rights in both thought and action.

Also taught as LS C140V.

 

 

 

Political Science 117 Theories of Justice
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Kutz
  • Birge 50
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 32236

Major perspectives in social and economic thought, e.g., natural law, natural right, laissez-faire,"possessive individualism,"contractualism, pluralism, and social equality as they affect contemporary discussion of "higher law," fairness, civic competence, and distributive justice.

Psychology C 162 Human Happiness
  • MW 10-11 AM
  • Keltner
  • Li Ka Shing 245
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 25108

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of happiness. The first part of the course will be devoted to the different treatments of happiness in the world's philosophical traditions, focusing up close on conceptions or the good life in classical Greek and Judeo-Christian thought, the great traditions in East Asian thought (Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism), and ideas about happiness that emerged more recently in the age of Enlightenment. With these different perspectives as a framework, the course will then turn to treatments of happiness in the behavioral sciences, evolutionary scholarship, and neuroscience. Special emphasis will be given to understanding how happiness arises in experiences of the moral emotions, including gratitude, compassion, reverence, and awe, as well as aesthetic emotions like humor and beauty.

Also taught as LS C160V.

 

Public Policy C 184 Energy and Society
  • TTH 2-3:30
  • Kammen
  • Haas Faculty Wing F295
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 28602

Energy source uses and impacts: an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy in international perspective, origins, and character of the energy crisis.

Rhetoric 103 A Approaches and Paradigms in the History of Rhetorical Theory
  • TTH 2-3:30
  • Naddaff
  • Barker 101
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 23633

A broad consideration of the historical relationships between philosophy, literature, and rhetoric, with special emphasis on selected themes of the classical and medieval periods.