Fall Courses

Displaying Courses 1 - 26 of 26 | Reset Filters
Fall 2016

ISF Courses

ISF 10 Enduring Questions and Great Books in the Western Tradition
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Bhandari
  • B1 Hearst Annex
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 33769

This course meets the College of Letters and Science Philosophy and Values (PV) breadth requirement.

This course is a broad survey of major canonical works (“Great Books”) emphasizing the Premodern traditions of Western Civilization since the Greeks. These texts offer responses to central questions that, across the disciplinary divides, continue to inform contemporary work in the social sciences and the humanities.  Indeed, the “disciplines” or departments as we know them on campus are of relatively recent invention, compared to the millennia of treatises, poetry, plays, literature, sacred writings, histories and philosophical inquiries that sought answers to the questions later asked by the disciplines themselves in the humanities and social sciences.  

This course is not a history of the disciplines, nor is it an attempt to find precursive texts for each discipline  -- we do not seek to construct disciplinary canons or genealogies.  Instead, it is an account of the enduring questions of western civilization that later found homes in the disciplines, but whose origins lie in a “pre-disciplinary” world.  While we choose the framework of the disciplines to present these texts, and to ask recurring questions that can today be found in separate disciplines, we seek to problematize the history of disciplinary knowledge.  In this course, we investigate how contemporary concerns about modern social problems have a deep, but also an interdisciplinary, history. 

ISF 61 Moral Reasoning and Human Action: The Quest for Judgment
  • MW 9-10
  • Klee
  • 20 Barrows
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 16918

This is an interdisciplinary survey course that seeks to understand how we define justice, evil, and individual responsibility in modern society. In particular we are going to probe carefully how humans reflect on and practice the process of moral reasoning. We will focus on human behavior in extreme situations: war, life and death conflicts, genocide and mass killing, as well as competing conceptions of human freedom. The course has a distinctive dual purpose. On the one hand we want to encourage the learning of critical thinking skills. This includes the ability to systematically evaluate information and competing moral claims. Also, it is intended as an exposure to the interdisciplinary approach. That is, how can different perspectives illuminate the same issue? With this in mind the course draws on important work from philosophy and ethics, social psychology, jurisprudential analysis, historical-political accounts, and personal memoirs. 

ISF 100 A Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • MW 4-6
  • Wren
  • 105 North Gate Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 16888

This course, required of all ISF majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber. Writing in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, their works cross the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts. We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society. 

ISF 100 F Theorizing Modern Capitalism: Controversies and Interpretations
  • TTH 2-330
  • Bhandari
  • 240 Bechtel
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 33927

This class meets the College of Letters and Science Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth requirement.

 

We shall read four interdisciplinary works that characterize contemporary capitalism not simply as an economy but as a complex social formation. Yet the works characterize that social formation variously - as network capitalism, patrimonial capitalism, neo-liberal capitalism and informal capitalism. The key concepts in each of these theories are, respectively: mobility, inheritance, deregulation and exclusion. Each of the works uses some combination of disciplines (history, sociology, anthropology, management science, economics and political science) and methods (historical archival work, time-series analysis and critical theory). Through these cutting-edge and widely discussed works students will come to understand the power of an interdisciplinary analysis through which knowledge acquired by a variety of methods about a complex object can be integrated. 

 
Readings: Jurgen Kocka, Capitalism: A Short History; Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty First Century; Kalyan Sanyal Rethinking Capitalist Development: Primitive Accumulation, Governmentality and Post-Colonial Capitalism; Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello The New Spirit of Capitalism; and David Kotz The Rise and Fall of Neo-Liberal Capitalism

 

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MWF 10-11
  • Xu
  • 70 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17852

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation. 

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MWF 12-1
  • Kelkar
  • 70 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17854

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TTH 10-11
  • Klee
  • 6 Evans Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17857

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4
  • Xu
  • 2 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17858

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TTH 4-5
  • Kelkar
  • 55 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17872

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

Approved Theory and Practice courses
Note: students who enroll in one of these courses cannot count the course as part of their Upper Division Course of Study Requirement.

Anthropology 114 History of Anthropological Thought 
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Hirschkind, C.
  • 4 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31668

This course will present a history of anthropological thought from the mid-19th century to the present, and will draw upon the major sub disciplines of anthropology. It will focus both upon the integration of the anthropological sub disciplines and upon the relationships between these and other disciplines outside anthropology. 

Anthropology 141 Comparative Society
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Ong, A.
  • 166 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 12821

Theories of social structure, functional interrelationships of social institutions. Primary emphasis on non-Western societies. 

Anthropology 169 C Language and Society
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Hanks
  • 221 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31797

This course provides an introduction to selected theories and methods in Linguistic Anthropology, with a focus on topics of relevance to ethnographic fieldwork. Readings and lectures are organized into three modules: Linguistic categories and their consequences for thought, the effects of social context on meaning, and the empirical basis of research on language. 

Bioengineering 100 Ethics in Science and Engineering
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • Yartsev
  • 106 Stanley
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 26397

The goal of this semester course is to present the issues of professional conduct in the practice of engineering, research, publication, public and private disclosures, and in managing professional and financial conflicts. The method is through historical didactic presentations, case studies, presentations of methods for problem solving in ethical matters, and classroom debates on contemporary ethical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national experts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and law from the UC Berkeley campus. 

Economics C 110 Game Theory in the Social Sciences
  • M 2-5
  • Kariv
  • Li Ka Shing 245
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 14498

A non-technical introduction to game theory. Basic principle, and models of interaction among players, with a strong emphasis on applications to political science, economics, and other social sciences. 

Education C 148 Education and International Development
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Murphy-Graham
  • Barrows 166
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 28731

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of international development education. Through the use of lectures, discussions, and multimedia presentations, students will examine three core themes: 1) the purpose of education; 2) how contemporary development policy conceptualizes education; 3) education as a tool for social transformation. To the extent possible, the course draws connections between theory and practical case studies of international education programs, policy statements, and initiatives. 

Education 186 C The Southern Border
  • TTH 2-330
  • Shaiken
  • 2050 VLSB
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 28732

The southern border--from California to Florida--is the longest physical divide between the First and Third Worlds. This course will examine the border as a distinct landscape where North-South relations take on a specific spatial and cultural dimension, and as a region which has been the testing ground for such issues as free trade, immigration, and ethnic politics. 

English 125 D 20th Century Novel
  • MWF 1-2
  • Jones, D.V.
  • 229 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 14769

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics--history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: How have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel? How has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel? And lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?

Environmental Science, Policy and Management (ESPM) 161 Environmental Philosophy and Ethics
  • MW 4-5
  • MERCHANT, C
  • 159 MULFORD
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 25180

A critical analysis of human environments as physical, social-economic, and techno cultural ecosystems with emphasis on the role of ideologies, beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. An examination of contemporary environmental literature and the philosophies embodied therein. 

History of Art 186 A Art in the Early 20th Century
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Grimaldo-Grigsby
  • 102 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31504

A consideration of major issues in art of the early 20th century. May focus on a particular place and period (e.g., Art in Paris or 1900-1914) or on a major artistic problem (e.g., Abstraction and Figuration). 

Legal Studies 103 Theories of Law and Society
  • MWF 8-9
  • Lieberman
  • 155 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31124

An historical examination of major interpretations of law, morals and social development, with special emphasis on the social thought of the 18th and 19th centuries and including the writings of Marx, Maine, Durkheim, Weber and other contemporary figures. 

Legal Studies 145 Law and Economics
  • MWF 4-5
  • Cooter
  • 2 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31129

The course will apply microeconomic theory analysis to legal rules and procedures. Emphasis will be given to the economic consequences of various sorts of liability rules, remedies for breach of contract and the allocation of property rights. The jurisprudential significance of the analysis will be discussed. 

Philosophy 138 Philosophy of Society
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Searle, J.R.
  • 140 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31334

This course deals with the ontology of society and thus provides a foundation for the social sciences. The main questions discussed are: 1) What is the mode of existence of social reality? 2) How does it relate to psychological and physical reality? 3) What implications does social ontology have for social explanations? 

Political Science 114 Theories of Governance: Late 20th Century
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Bevir
  • 126 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 20750

What is governance? How should we explain its emergence? What are its implications for public policy and democracy? This course uses debates about contemporary governance to examine four approaches to political science and political theory. The approaches are rational choice theory, institutionalism, Marxism, and post structuralism. The course looks at the narrative that each approach provides of the origins and workings of governance since 1979, and at the way these narratives embody theoretical commitments about rationality and power, structure and agency, and democracy. It thus promotes an awareness of the way questions about contemporary governance are inextricably linked to philosophical and normative commitments. 

Psychology C 113 Biological Clocks: Physiology and Behavior
  • TTH 3-4
  • TBA
  • 120 Latimer
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 30643

A consideration of the biological clocks that generate daily, lunar, seasonal and annual rhythms in various animals including people. Emphasis on neuroendocrine substrates, development and adaptive significance of estrous cycles, feeding rhythms, sleep-wakefulness cycles, reproductive and hibernation cycles, body weight and migratory  cycles. 

Psychology 160 Social Psychology
  • MW 10-11
  • CHEN, S
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 21851

Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems. 

Public Policy C 184 Energy and Society
  • TTH 2-330
  • KAMMEN, D M
  • 105 Stanley Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 29178

Energy sources, uses, and impacts: an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy in international perspective, origins, and character of energy crisis.