Archive of Spring 2017

Displaying Courses 1 - 26 of 26
Spring 2017

ISF Courses

ISF 61 Moral Reasoning and Human Action: The Quest for Judgment
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Klee
  • 145 Moffitt
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 31444

This is an interdisciplinary survey course that seeks to understand how we define justice, evil, and individual responsibility in modern society. In particular we are going to probe carefully how humans reflect on and practice the process of moral reasoning. We will focus on human behavior in extreme situations: war, life and death conflicts, genocide and mass killing, as well as competing conceptions of human freedom. The course has a distinctive dual purpose. On the one hand we want to encourage the learning of critical thinking skills. This includes the ability to systematically evaluate information and competing moral claims. Also, it is intended as an exposure to the interdisciplinary approach. That is, how can different perspectives illuminate the same issue? With this in mind the course draws on important work from philosophy and ethics, social psychology, jurisprudential analysis, historical-political accounts, and personal memoirs. 

ISF 100 A Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • Bhandari
  • 106 Stanley
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17324

This course, required of all ISF majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber. Writing in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, their works cross the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts. We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society. 

ISF 100 C Language and Identity
  • MWF 1-2
  • Xu
  • 247 Cory Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 31415

This course examines the role of language in the construction of social identities, and how language is tied to various forms of symbolic power at the national and international levels. As the saying goes, “A language is a dialect with an army and navy” – but how so? Questions about language have been central to national culture and identity, and the languages we speak often prove, upon close examination, not to be the tongues of ancestors but invented traditions of political significance. People have also encoded resistance into non-official and ambiguous languages even as the state has attempted to devalue them as inferior forms of expression. Drawing on case studies from Southeast Asia, Europe, Canada, and the U.S., we will pay special attention to topics such as the legitimization of a national language, the political use of language in nation-building processes, the endangerment of indigenous languages, and processes of linguistic subordination and domination.  This course will be interdisciplinary in its attempt to understand language in terms of history, politics, anthropology and sociology. We will not only study how language has been envisioned in planning documents and official language policy, but also analyze how speakers enact, project, and contest their culturally specific subject positions according to their embodied linguistic capital. 

ISF 100 G Introduction to Science, Society, and Ethics
  • TTH 2-330
  • Kelkar
  • 101 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 33029

This course surveys the entanglements of science and technology with states, publics, and the question of expertise and governance.  We will ask: what are science and technology, and how have states deployed them to govern publics while being transformed at the same time?  How have citizens, elites, and experts pushed back? In particular, we will examine particular scientific and technological processes and controversies to understand science-state-society relations: from quantification and standardization to race science, standardized testing, technological disasters, GMOs, financial instruments, net neutrality, and digital privacy among others.  The question of "ethics" will be explored not so much in terms of evaluating what is right or wrong, but in terms of how the processes of technology design, knowledge production, and governance are themselves saturated with values every step of the way. Our readings will mostly be drawn from the interdisciplinary field of science, technology, and society, but we will also draw on history, sociology, anthropology, political theory, and public policy. 

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MWF 10-11
  • Xu
  • 3 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17338

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation. 

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Kelkar
  • 237 Cory Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17339

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 2-3
  • Wren
  • 4 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17341

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TTH 2-330
  • Klee
  • 102 Wurster
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17344

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4
  • Xu
  • 2 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17342

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 9-10
  • Klee
  • 2 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17340

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 11-12
  • Kelkar
  • 4 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17343

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor. The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their course of study. 

ISF 198 The US Election of 2016 in Global Context: A Semester-Long Teach-In
  • Tuesdays, 4-6PM
  • Sahlins
  • 50 Birge
  • 2 Units
  • Class Number: 17350

The unexpected victory in November 2016 of Donald Trump, a celebrity businessman with a twitter account and no political experience, is not just an American story.  From Estonia to Spain, and from India to Australia, strange right-wing movements have taken shape, each informed by local conditions and politics, but enabled by new media technologies.

What does the Trump victory signify?  A reaction of the economically disposessed to globalization, multiculturalism, and identity politics? A new and dysfunctional democratic politics driven by “false news” across social media platforms, and unreliable reporting from the old media?  An old wine of nativism, populism, white nationalism, or even fascism deployed in a new global bottle?

This interdisciplinary teach-in will consist of campus specialists from a range of disciplines who seek to engage students in a critical discussion of these and other questions.  A political scientist will ask about the kind of political movement represented by Trump and the failure of the polls to predict his victory; a geographer will consider Trump in the context of globalization; a psychologist will query the cognitive dysfunctions produced during the campaign; a legal scholars will speak to the constitutional questions raised in the unprecedented corruption of business and politics; historians will shed light on the relative novelty of “Trumpism” as it takes shape not only in the US but in Great Britain, France, and Germany, talking about history as it's happening; an anthropologist will look at the customs of protests; a public policy specialist will consider  Trump's plutocratic government in the context of growing income inequality; an economist will examine critically mitigation possible in the future climate catastrophe; an Islamicist will talk about Trump in the Arab world; cultural critics will address the questions of race, class, and sex in the language of the Trump administration and among its many opponents; and more. 

Confirmed participants include Wendy Brown (Political Science), Dylan Riley (Sociology), Max Auffhamer (Agricultural and Resource Economics), Rakesh Bhandari (ISF), Gillian Hart (Geography), Robin Einhorn (History), Rudy Mendoza-Denton (Psychology), Dick Walker (Geography), James Vernon (History), and Marshall Sahlins (Anthropology, UChicago). A full schedule and syllabus will be available shortly. 

Students have the option of signing up for a one-unit writing seminar run by the Townsend Center Art of Writing program and taught by Professor Ramona Naddaff from Rhetoric  (ISF 198.6: What to Think?: Writing after January 20, 2017). The one-unit seminar meets for one hour after each class in 3335 Dwinelle.  More information may be found here: http://live-isf.pantheon.berkeley.edu/spring-2017-isf-198-art-writing-what-think-writing-after-january-20-2017

Requirements include attendance at all talks; daily briefings of the New York Times, the Guardian, and other sometimes reliable sources of information; short weekly readings; and several modest writing assignments. 

Questions regarding this course should be directed to Professor Sahlins: sahlins@berkeley.edu

Approved Theory and Practice courses

Anthropology 137 Energy, Culture and Social Organization
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Nader
  • 100 Lewis
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 12549

This course will consider the human dimensions of particular energy production and consumption patterns. It will examine the influence of culture and social organization on energy use, energy policy, and quality of life issues in both the domestic and international setting. Specific treatment will be given to mind-sets, ideas of progress, cultural variation in time perspectives and resource use, equity issues, and the role of power holders in energy related questions.

Anthropology 156 Anthropology of the Contemporary
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Rabinow, P.M.
  • 221 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 12556

This course is an introduction to the conceptual field of "the contemporary," a stylization of both old and new elements that stands in contrast to "modernity", and "post modernity", and which opens up inquiries into the actual state of things, particulary for anthropology. Anthropology 155, while not required, is highly recommended as a prerequisite.

Development Studies C 100 History of Development and Underdevelopment 
  • TTH 2-330
  • Hart, G.P.
  • Hearst Mining 390
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 14062

Historical review of the development of world economic systems and the impact of these developments on less advanced countries. Course objective is to provide a background against which to understand and assess theoretical interpretations of development and underdevelopment.

Economics 115 The World Economy in the Twentieth Century
  • MW 6:30-8PM
  • Delong
  • 160 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 14189

Development of the world economic system with particular reference to world-wide trading relationships. This course is equivalent to History 160; students will not receive credit for both courses.

Environmental Science, Policy and Management (ESPM) 168 Political Ecology
  • TTH 3:30-5
  • PELUSO, N L
  • 101 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 32309

Analysis of environmental problems in an international context with a focus on political and economic processes, resource access, and representations of nature. Discussion of the ways in which film, literature, and the news media reflect and influence environmental politics. Approaches to policy analysis arising from recent social theory.

Gender and Women's Studies 101 Doing Feminist Research
  • M 3-6PM
  • Nelson
  • 219 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 15818

In this course, students will learn to do feminist research using techniques from the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The teaching of interdisciplinary research skills will focus on practices of gender in a particular domain such as labor, love, science, aesthetics, film, religion, politics, or kinship. Topics will vary depending on the instructor.

Geography 130 Food and the Environment
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • SAYRE, N
  • 10 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 15473

How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth, hunger and obesity, and poverty.

History 186 International and Global History Since 1945
  • TTH 2-330
  • SARGENT, D J
  • 50 Birge
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 32123

This course explores great and complex global historical changes that have taken place since the end of the second World War. By situating the major postwar upheavals - from decolonization to the Cold War; from population growth to environmental degradation; from globalization to the endurance of economic inequalities - in comparative and international contexts, this course encourages students to see the origins of our own times and dilemmas in their proper historical context and provides an introduction to recent international and gloal history.

History of Art 100 Theories and Methods of Art History
  • MW 5-6:30
  • Davis, W.M.
  • 102 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 15903

Special Title Course

Methods and Theories of Art History

This course is required of majors in History of Art. It reviews major paradigms of art-historical method and theory in relation to relevant developments in philosophy, aesthetics, history, anthropology, and other disciplines. Topics include antiquarianism, the legacy of critical idealism, stylistic analysis and connoisseurship, formalism, iconography, visual studies and vision science, gender in the arts, world art studies, digital horizons in art history, and neuroaesthetics among others. The course is appropriate for students who have taken lecture and/or seminar courses in various fields of art history (e.g., in Modern Art or Asian Art) and/or in closely cognate subjects (e.g., in Classical Archaeology, Critical Theory, or Aesthetics). It is not suitable for students with no background in art history; it is not a first course in or introduction to the history of art.

Information C 103 History of Information
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • DUGUID, P
  • 155 Kroeber
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 33594

This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as "the information age." We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we'll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Legal Studies 100 Foundations of Legal Studies
  • MWF 11-12
  • Simon
  • 2 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 30842

This is a liberal arts course designed to introduce students to the foundational frameworks and cross-disciplinary perspectives from humanities and social sciences that distinguish legal studies as a scholarly field. It provides a comparative and historical introduction to forms, ideas, institutions, and systems of law and sociological ordering. It highlights basic theoretical problems and scholarly methods for understanding questions of law and justice.

Psychology 156 Human Emotion
  • MW 11-12
  • Keltner, D.
  • Boalt 175
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 31268

This course will examine two different theoretical perspectives on emotion: (1) the differential emotions approach with its strong evolutionary grounding, and (2) the social constructionist approach. Next, the course will investigate empirical research on many facets of emotion including facial expression, physiology, appraisal, and the lexicon of emotion. Finally, we will consider more specific topics including social interaction, culture, gender, personality, and psychopathology.

Rhetoric 108 Rhetoric of Philosophical Discourse
  • TTH 5-630
  • Porter
  • 185 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 32930

Introduction to theoretical issues involved in applying rhetorical analysis to philosophical discourse; intensive analysis of selected philosophical works.

Sociology 160 Sociology of Culture
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Fourcade-Gourinchas
  • 160 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 30963

This survey course studies human meaning systems, particularly as manifested in art, literature, music, and other media. It includes study of the production, reception, and aesthetic experience of cultural forms.