Archive of Spring 2014

Displaying Courses 1 - 16 of 16
Spring 2014

ISF Courses

ISF 61 Moral Reasoning and Human Action: The Quest for Judgment
  • TuTh 9:30-11
  • Earl Klee
  • 126 Barrows
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 45503

This is an interdisciplinary survey course that seeks to understand how we define justice, evil, and individual responsibility in modern society. In particular we are going to probe carefully how humans reflect on and practice the process of moral reasoning. We will focus on human behavior in extreme situations: war, life and death conflicts, genocide and mass killing, as well as competing conceptions of human freedom. The course has a distinctive dual purpose. On the one hand we want to encourage the learning of critical thinking skills. This includes the ability to systematically evaluate information and competing moral claims. Also, it is intended as an exposure to the interdisciplinary approach. That is, how can different perspectives illuminate the same issue? With this in mind the course draws on important work from philosophy and ethics, social psychology, jurisprudential analysis, historical-political accounts, and personal memoirs.

ISF 100 A Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TTH 2-330
  • Gary Wren
  • 277 Cory
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45515

This course, required of all ISF Majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx (1818-1883) and Max Weber (1864-1920).  Writing in what might be called the "pre disciplinary" period of the modern social sciences, their works cross the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts. We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society in nineteenth-century Europe.  But we will also make efforts to evaluate their intellectual contributions in light of recent scholarship about contemporary social issues, exploring ways in which scholars across the social sciences and humanities continue to interpret their respective contributions. 

ISF 100 B Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TTH 12:30-2
  • Robert Ehrlich
  • 180 TAN HALL
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45545

This is a course exploring how we understand the idea of the self in contemporary social worlds. The course shares the presumption that the modern self is a created endeavor. It charts traditional and contemporary understandings of individual identity, the maturation process and the notion of an inner life, the concepts of freedom and individual agency, the force of evolution and heredity, and the influence of social causation. The course stresses the complex interplay between the development of a sense of self, and the socialization pressures at work in the family, society, and global cultures.  

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 385 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45551

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190, and students will produce in the last unit of the course an ISF Senior Thesis Prospectus.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TuTh 9:30-11
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 103 Wheeler
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45563

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4
  • Robert Ehrlich
  • 35 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45557

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 2-3
  • Gary Wren
  • 35 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45566

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 9-10
  • Earl Klee
  • 31 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45560

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

 

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TTH 1-2
  • Bruce Newsome
  • 206 Wheeler
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45569

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

Approved Theory and Practice courses

Anthropology 115 Medical Anthropology
  • TTH 2-330
  • Nancy Scheper-Hughes
  • 160 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02678

These classes offered in departments of the College will meet the second ISF 100-series methodology requirement

 

This core undergraduate course in medical anthropology offers an overview of the field, an introduction to its important theoretical, conceptual and methodological approaches, with an emphasis on its pragmatic and theoretical contributions to contemporary problems and questions.

Anthropology 137 Energy, Culture and Social Organization
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Laura Nader
  • 105 Stanley Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02723

This course will consider the human dimensions of particular energy production and consumption patterns. It will examine the influence of culture and social organization on energy use, energy policy, and quality of life issues in both the domestic 

and international setting. Specific treatment will be given to mind-sets, ideas of progress, cultural variation in time perspectives and resource use, equity issues, and the role of power holders in energy related questions.

Education C 145 Literacy through Literature
  • Tu 4-7
  • Claire Kramsch
  • 5634 Tolman
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 23734

Three hours of lecture per week. Exploration of the role that literature can play in the acquisition of literacy in a first and second language. Linguistic and psycholinguistic issues: orality and literacy, discourse text, schema theory, and reading research. Literary issues: stylistics and critical reading, reader response, structure of narratives. Educational issues: the literary text in the social context of its production and reception by intended and non-intended readers. Also listed as German C106.

History 159 B European Economic History
  • TTH 3:30-5
  • Jan De Vries
  • 145 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39630

The Industrial Revolution and the rise of the European economy to world dominance in the 19th century, emphasizing the diffusion of the industrial system and its consequences, the world trading system, and the rise of modern imperialism.

History 182 Technology and Society
  • MW 4-5:30
  • Massimo Mazzotti
  • 102 Wurster
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39696

What drives technological change? How does technology transfer across different cultures? These and other related questions are examined using historical case studies of productive, military, domestic, information, and biomedical technologies from 1700 to the present. The aim of the course is for students to learn about how technology affects social change and, especially, how technological change is invariably shaped by historical and social circumstances.

History 183 A Health and Disease
  • MWF 1-2
  • Monica Libell
  • 88 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39705

This course introduces major themes in the history of medicine through the lens of disease. It focuses on two questions: How have people defined well-being? How have they responded to illness? Themes considered include changing theories of disease causality, the development of international public health policy, social understandings of the body, and the growth of the pharmaceutical industry. Disease case studies will be analyzed through readings and films.

Political Science 138 G National Success and Failure in the Age of a Global Economy: from Pleats to Cleats
  • TuTh 3:30-5
  • John Zysman
  • 126 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 71766

In the present era political, economic, and social organization powerfully influence national capacity to assure economic success, real and rising incomes for the population, and political success, basic survival, and the projection of its purposes and values. This course looks at the continual process of international competition and transformation, and examines which factors separate the winners from the losers. We will gain leverage into these questions by examining critical moments in the 20th and 21st centuries and analyze according to national responses. What choices signal success? Can the failures be avoided? The course will discuss whether globalization is shunting aside national political choice, or whether globalization is in fact a sequence of national and regional stories played out on a larger stage. We will consider how economic constraint structures political choice and national response to the global economy. But we will also examine how political developments shape market dynamics and national innovations. We will learn about all sorts of things from the politics of French fashion to why Japanese make good cars.