Archive of Fall 2015

Displaying Courses 1 - 27 of 27
Fall 2015

ISF Courses

ISF 100 A - Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • MW 2-4
  • Gary Wren
  • 101 Morgan
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45515

This course, required of all ISF Majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber.  Writing in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, their works cross  the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts.  We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society in  nineteenth-century Europe.  But we will also make efforts to evaluate their intellectual contributions in light of recent scholarship about contemporary social issues, exploring ways in which scholars across the social sciences and humanities continue to interpret their respective contributions. The class meets twice a week in lecture and once in section and has no prerequisites. 

ISF 100 F - Theorizing Modern Capitalism: Controversies and Interpretations
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 170 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45539

We shall read four interdisciplinary works that characterize contemporary capitalism not simply as an economy but as a complex social formation. Yet the works characterize that social formation variously - as network capitalism, patrimonial capitalism, neo-liberal capitalism and informal capitalism. The key concepts in each of these theories are, respectively: mobility, inheritance, deregulation and exclusion. Each of the works uses some combination of disciplines (history, sociology, anthropology, management science, economics and political science) and methods (historical archival work, time-series analysis and critical theory). Through these cutting-edge and widely discussed works students will come to understand the power of an interdisciplinary analysis through which knowledge acquired by a variety of methods about a complex object can be integrated. 

 
Readings: Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty First Century; Kalyan Sanyal Rethinking Capitalist Development: Primitive Accumulation, Governmentality and Post-Colonial Capitalism; Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello The New Spirit of Capitalism; and David Kotz The Rise and Fall of Neo-Liberal Capitalism

 

ISF C 145 - Multicultural Europe
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Renate Holub
  • 3106 Etcheverry Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45557

In this course, we will trace some of the substantive changes and transformations taking place in contemporary Europe in the areas of culture, society, and politics. In particular, we will look at the effects of massive migration flows--due to globalization processes--on the national culture of the core countries and examine the ways in which particular national cultures react to the increasing multiculturization of Europe. The goal of the course is, first of all, to familiarize students with a variety of cultural, social, and political innovations that accompany the formation of multicultural Europe. This involves (1) an examination of the traditional concepts of nationhood and citizenship, and (2) a study of the Europeanization of culture.

ISF 189 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MW 3-4
  • Bruce Newsome
  • 247 Dwinelle Hall
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 45571

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 189 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MW 9-10
  • Earl Klee
  • 385 Leconte
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 45563

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

 

ISF 189 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • M 12-2
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 4 Evans
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 45566

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

 

ISF 189 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MW 10-11
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 6 Evans Hall
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 45560

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

 

ISF 190 - Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4
  • Robert Ehrlich
  • 5 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45575

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major.   The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

ISF 190 - Senior Thesis
  • TTH 4-5
  • Renate Holub
  • 101 Wheeler
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45581

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major.   The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

ISF 190 - Senior Thesis
  • TTH 10-11
  • Earl Klee
  • 263 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45572

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major.   The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

Approved Theory and Practice courses

Anthropology 155 - Modernity
  • TTH 2-330
  • Rabinow, P.M.
  • 101 2251 COLLEGE
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02672

This upper division course presents episodes in the understanding of anthropos (man, humanity, civilization, etc.) in its modern figuration. The course will juxtapose the conceptual repertoire of key thinkers about modernity, and will examine episodes in the history of the arts and/or sciences.

Anthropology 189 - Special Topics: "Cities and Citizenship"
  • TTH 2-330
  • Holston, J.
  • 150 GSPP
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02738

"Citiies and Citizenship." Various topics covering current research theory, method; issues of social and cultural concern; culture change, conflict, and adaptation. May combine more than one subdiscipline of Anthropology.

Anthropology 189 - Special Topics: "Transnational Asia"
  • TTH 2-330
  • Ong, A.
  • 130 Wheeler Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02744

"Transnational Asia" registers the intertwined, unstable and unfolding processes that are shaping an emerging world region.  Instead of taking an area studies approach,this course identifies key dynamics and contexts of momentous change driven by flows of humans, capital, products, ideas and practices spilling beyond political borders. Besides a particular region of nation-states, 'Asia' is also constituted through multiple and overlapping cultures, communities, and imaginaries of global emergence.The acceleration, inter-connection, and density of flows, circulations, and networks effect novel attitudes, practices, and predicaments that are increasingly transnational in scope and substance.

City and Regional Planning 119 - Planning for Sustainability
  • TuTh 2-3:30
  • ACEY, C S
  • 106 Wurster
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 14355

This course examines how the concept of sustainable development applies to cities and urban regions and gives students insight into a variety of contemporary urban planning issues through the sustainability lens. The course combines lectures, discussions, student projects, and guest appearances by leading practitioners in Bay Area sustainability efforts. Ways to coordinate goals of environment, economy, and equity at different scales of planning are addressed, including the region, the city, the neighborhood, and the site.

Comparative Literature 100 - Introduction to Comparative Literature- "Narrative and Desire"
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • BRITTO, K A
  • 262 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17302

An introduction to problems of the comparative study of literature and culture. Emphasis on principles of comparative methods and analysis with focus on selected literary, critical, and theoretical texts from antiquity to the present. Readings in English and at least one foreign language.

Economics C 110 - Game Theory in the Social Sciences
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • POWELL, R L
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 22540

Note: Cross-listed with Political Science C135

A non-technical introduction to game theory. Basic principle, and models of interaction among players, with a strong emphasis on applications to political science, economics, and other social sciences.

Economics 119 - Psychology and Economics
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • ACLAND, D J
  • 105 Stanley Hall
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 22594

This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be incorporated into economics. The implications of these new assumptions for theoretical and empirical economics will be explored.

Energy and Resources Group C 100 - Energy and Society
  • TTH 2-330
  • KAMMEN, D M
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 27574

Note: Cross-listed with Public Policy C184

Energy sources, uses, and impacts: an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy in international perspective, origins, and character of energy crisis.

Environmental Science, Policy and Management 161 - Environmental Philosophy and Ethics
  • MW 4-5:30
  • MERCHANT, C
  • 159 MULFORD
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 29606

A critical analysis of human environments as physical, social-economic, and techno-cultural ecosystems with emphasis on the role of ideologies, beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. An examination of contemporary environmental literature and the philosophies embodied therein.

Environmental Science, Policy and Management 168 - Political Ecology
  • TTH 3:30-5
  • PELUSO, N L
  • 150 GSPP
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 29657

Analysis of environmental problems in an international context with a focus on political and economic processes, resource access, and representations of nature. Discussion of the ways in which film, literature, and the news media reflect and influence environmental politics. Approaches to policy analysis arising from recent social theory.

Gender and Women's Studies 133 AC - Women, Men, and Other Animals: Human Animality in American Cultures
  • MW 4-5:30
  • CHEN, M Y
  • 145 Moffitt
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 32978

Explores various ways that human groups and interests, particularly in the United States, have both attached and divorced themselves from other animals, with particular focus on gender, race, ability, and sexuality as the definitional foils for human engagements with animality.

History 100 U - From Plato to Nato: Great Books, Big Ideas
  • MW 4-5:30
  • BAKHLE, J
  • 141 Giannini
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39351

Why read “Great Books”?  Who or what makes them “Great,” and for whom and for what purpose? What is the relationship between text and historical context, and between the historical text and our present social, cultural, and intellectual contexts? These questions inform our approach to the (mostly) European canonical texts studied in the course, the foundations of modern thought.  We move swiftly and critically from Plato to Foucault, considering texts from Ancient Greece, the Abrahamic religions of the Book, the medieval Scholastics, the Protestant Reformation, colonialism, the Age of Revolutions, 19th century social theory and 20th century post-colonialism. We will approach each text critically, but with an intellectual openness that tries to capture the multiple possible interpretations of a text, as we pursue questions about the constitution of the social order, the foundations of political legitimacy, the relations of belief and knowledge, and the relations of collective self and “other.”  The aim of the course is to develop the skills of critical reading and writing; requirements including four papers and active class participation.

Letters and Science C 140 V - The History and Practice of Human Rights
  • TuTh 2-330
  • SARGENT, D J
  • 159 MULFORD
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 52176

Cross-listed with History C187 section 1. Go to lsdiscovery.berkeley.edu for more details. 

Description: A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the evolution of human rights in both thought and action.

Psychology 160 - Social Psychology
  • MW 10-11
  • CHEN, S
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 74145

Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems.

Note: Enrollment is reserved for declared psychology majors during Tele-Bears Phase I. Enrollment will be open to all students during Phase II on a first-come, first-served basis. A wait list will not be available until Phase II. For detailed enrollment guidelines and course information, please visit http://psychology.berkeley.edu/students/undergraduate-program/undergradu...

Psychology 167 AC - Stigma and Prejudice
  • MW 1-2
  • MENDOZA-DENTON, R
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 74187

Traditionally, research on prejudice and stereotyping has focused on the psychological mechanisms that lead people to be biased against others. Recent research has begun to shed light on the psychological legacy of prejudice and stereotyping for their targets. This course will review the major contributions of each of these literatures, providing students with a broad understanding of both classic and current issues in the field. The course will be divided into three sections: bias (i.e., the perpetrator'sperspective), stigma (i.e., the target's perspective), and intergroup relations.

Enrollment is reserved for declared psychology majors during Tele-Bears Phase I. Enrollment will be open to all students during Phase II on a first-come, first-served basis. A wait list will not be available until Phase II. For detailed enrollment guidelines and course information, please visit http://psychology.berkeley.edu/students/undergraduate-program/undergradu...

Rhetoric 108 - Rhetoric of Philosophical Discourse
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • TBA
  • 209 DWINELLE
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 77887

Introduction to theoretical issues involved in applying rhetorical analysis to philosophical discourse; intensive analysis of selected philosophical works.

Sociology 140 - Politics and Social Change
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • TUGAL, C Z
  • 141 McCone
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 82152

This survey course studies the relationship between society and politics through an analysis of the intersection of economic development, social relations, and the political sphere. Examines how class, race, ethnicity, and gender interact with political culture, ideology, and the state. The course also looks at diverse forms of political behavior, a key aspect of politics.

Note: All seats reserved for declared sociology majors only in Tele-BEARS Phase I. Enrollment may open up for undeclared and outside majors in Phase II depending on space availability, and according to priorities. Wait lists for all upper division sociology courses are not available until Phase II. For questions, course descriptions, enrollment priorities and procedures in sociology courses go to sociology.berkeley.edu/?page=undergradcourses.