Archive of Fall 2014

Displaying Courses 1 - 26 of 26
Fall 2014

ISF Courses

ISF 100 A Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TTH 2-330
  • Wren
  • 50 Birge
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45515

This course, required of all ISF Majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber.  Writing in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, their works cross  the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts.  We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society in  nineteenth-century Europe.  But we will also make efforts to evaluate their intellectual contributions in light of recent scholarship about contemporary social issues, exploring ways in which scholars across the social sciences and humanities continue to interpret their respective contributions. The class meets twice a week in lecture and once in section and has no prerequisites. 

 

ISF 100 B Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Klee
  • 9 Lewis
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45539

This is a course exploring how we understand the idea of the self in contemporary social worlds. The course shares the presumption that the modern self is a created endeavor. It charts traditional and contemporary understandings of individual identity, the maturation process and the notion of an inner life, the concepts of freedom and individual agency, the force of evolution and heredity, and the influence of social causation. The course stresses the complex interplay between the development of a sense of self, and the socialization pressures at work in the family, society, and global cultures.  

ISF 100 D Introduction to Technology, Society, and Culture
  • MW 10-12
  • Holub
  • 101 LSA
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45542

This course surveys the technological revolutions of the 19th and 20th centuries, it then focuses on the development of the computer and the Internet. The final part examines the impact of the Internet on social movements.

ISF 100 F Theorizing Modern Capitalism: Controversies and Interpretations
  • MW 10-12
  • Klee
  • 110 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45550

This course is intended as an analysis of the various theories about the nature and direction of modern capitalism. Our attention will be on the five classic and inescapable works of post-Marxist analysis that have a non-deterministic and relatively open-ended focus. We will also add a final section on three provocative works trying to chart contemporary political/economic transformations.

Our goal will center on capturing the nature and logic of modern capitalism as well as trying to plot its trajectory. We are particularly interested in the interplay between political/economic structure and the nature of human behavior. How does the state shape capitalist reality without losing its essential dynamism? What roles do human reason and irrationality play in the choices people make?

These are the kinds of concerns we will untangle. In particular, we will focus on emerging geopolitical realities and evolving forms of capitalism.

Readings

1. Douglass North et al. Violence and Social Orders: A Conceptual Framework for Interpreting Recorded Human History

2. Max Weber. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism with Other Writings on the Rise of the West  

3. Joseph Schumpeter. Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

4. John Maynard Keynes. The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

5. F.A. Hayek. The Fatal Conceit

6. Ian Bremmer. The End of the Free Market

7. Thomas Piketty. Capital in the Twenty-First Century

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MW 2-3
  • Wren
  • 385 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45575

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • TTH 12:30-2
  • Bhandari
  • 5 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45569

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • M 4-7
  • Renate Holub
  • 72 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45584

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Rakesh Bhandari
  • 35 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45578

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4
  • Robert Ehrlich
  • 35 Evans
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45581

For Declared Majors Only

[Note for ISF 190 Sections] Attendance in ISF 190 is required during the first two week of class (or you may be dropped). NOTE: If you are planning to do the CREATIVE OPTION in relation to your thesis, please see Robert Ehrlich immediately during his drop-in office hours.

Approved Theory and Practice courses

Anthropology 141 Comparative Society
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • Aihwa Ong
  • 155 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 02612

"Transnational Asia" registers the intertwined, unstable and unfolding processes that are shaping an emerging world region.  Instead of taking an area studies approach, this course identifies key dynamics and contexts of momentous change driven by flows of humans, capital, products, ideas and practices spilling beyond political borders. Besides a particular region of nation-states, 'Asia' is also constituted through multiple and overlapping cultures, communities, and imaginaries of global emergence. The acceleration, inter-connection, and density of flows, circulations, and networks effect novel attitudes, practices, and predicaments that are increasingly transnational in scope and substance.

The course explores transnationalism through anthropological lens of everyday practice. There are 4 sections. First, we look at how the cross-border strategies of Asian subjects in search of capital and refuge overseas de-stabilize established identity schemes in host countries. Second, we consider how circulations of migrant workers and tourists disrupt conventional  forms of citizenship, morality, and identity in Asian nations. Third, we explore how overseas models of education, consumption and prestige transform middle class family practice, values and affects. Finally, we trace how as an emerging site for exporting models of city planning and art, Asia is gaining a new global presence.  

 

Comparative Literature 100 Introduction to Comparative Literature- "Rewriting the Canon"
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Karl Britto
  • 223 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 17311

In this course, we will approach the work of comparison by examining a number of texts by authors from Africa and the Caribbean, all written in self-conscious relationship to earlier works from the European canon. In what ways—and to what ends—do authors rework, reimagine, and rewrite canonical literature? How are similar stories, characters, and narrative structures transformed by authors writing from different historical, cultural, and geographic locations? What dynamics of power are revealed when postcolonial perspectives are brought to bear upon European texts? We will address these questions and others as we hone our skills in comparative analysis. Specific readings TBA.

Economics 151 Labor Economics
  • TuTh 9:30-11
  • Arindrajit Dube
  • 4 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 22663

This course will analyze the economic forces that shape labor markets, institutions, and performance in the U.S., Japan, and at least one European country (usually Germany). Institutions examined include trade unions, legal regulations, and social conventions.

History 146 Latin American Women
  • TuTh 2-3:30
  • Margaret Chowning
  • 219 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39626

This class surveys the experiences and impact of women in Latin America from the pre-conquest period to the present, as well as the ways that gender ideologies (like patriarchy, honor-shame, machismo) have influenced Latin American history.

 

 

History C 187 History and Practice of Human Rights
  • TTH 12:30-2
  • Dan Sargent
  • 145 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39735

A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the evolution of human rights in both thought and action. Also listed as Letters and Science C140V.

History C 188 A Art and Science
  • TTH 12:30-2
  • Massimo Mazzotti
  • 141 McCone
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 39762

This course explores the intersections of art and science in medieval, modern, and contemporary history. It focuses on the ways in which artistic and scientific practices have shaped and legitimated each other through the ages. The course takes the form of an overview that spans from the awakening of European culture through the reception of new knowledge from the Near East to the most recent encounters between art and technoscience in the 21st century. Also listed as History of Art C156B.

Legal Studies 103 Theories of Law and Society
  • MWF 9-10
  • David Lieberman
  • 155 Kroeber
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 51533

A historical examination of major interpretations of law, morals and social development, with special emphasis on the social thought of the 18th and 19th centuries. The course covers Montesquieu, Maine, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and other theorists.

Legal Studies 182 Law, Politics, and Society
  • TTH 8-9:30
  • Malcolm Feeley
  • 150 GSPP
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 51632

This course examines the theory and practice of legal institutions in performing several major functions of law: allocating authority, defining relationships, resolving conflict, adapting to social change, and fostering social solidarity. In doing so, it will assess the nature and limits of law as well as consider alternative perspectives on social control and social change.

Political Science 114 A Theories of Governance: Late 20th Century
  • TTH 9:30-11
  • Mark Bevir
  • 20 Barrows
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 71595

What is governance? How should we explain its emergence? What are its implications for public policy and democracy? This course uses debates about contemporary governance to examine four approaches to political science and political theory. The approaches are rational choice theory, institutionalism, Marxism, and poststructuralism. The course looks at the narrative that each approach provides of the origins and workings of governance since 1979, and at the way these narratives embody theoretical commitments about rationality and power, structure and agency, and democracy. It thus promotes an awareness of the way questions about contemporary governance are inextricably linked to philosophical and normative commitments. This course has a required discussion section.

Political Science 138 E The Varieties of Capitalism: Political Economic Systems of the World
  • TuTh 12:30-2
  • Steven Vogel
  • 106 Stanley
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 71700

This course examines the interaction between politics and markets, both in theory and in practice, linking classic works on political economy (Smith, Marx, List) with current policy debates. It emphasizes the ways in which markets are embedded in social and political institutions. We study how political systems and markets are organized in a wide range of different national settings, looking both at history and contemporary issues. Topics include: 1) Early industrialization in Britain and the United States, 2) Late industrialization in Continental Europe and Japan, 3) The varieties of capitalism in the industrialized countries, 4) The Newly Industrializing Economies of Latin American and East Asia, 5) The problems of development, 6) The transition from communism to the market economy in Eastern Europe and China. We conclude the course with a review of recent developments in the global economy.

Psychology 150 Psychology of Personality
  • TTH 12-1
  • Oliver John
  • 100 GPB
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 74265

A consideration of general and systematic issues in the study of personality and an evaluation of major theories and points of view.

Psychology 160 Social Psychology
  • MW 10-11
  • Serena Chen
  • 245 LI KA SHING
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 74307

Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems.

Public Policy 190 Poverty and Inequality
  • TTH 8-10
  • Rucker Johnson
  • 105 GSPP
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 77157

This course will examine the nature and extent of poverty in
the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the antipoverty effects of existing and proposed
government programs and policies. The types of questions to be addressed include the
following: What is poverty? Why is poverty so persistent? Why are poverty rates for
minorities so high? Is there a culture of poverty? What are the interrelationships among
poverty, family structure, inner city neighborhoods, labor market conditions and public
policies? Is poverty passed on from generation to generation? The first ten weeks of this
course (Topics 1-6) focuses on social science theory and evidence about the causes,
consequences and costs of poverty. The last four weeks of the course (Topics 7-9) examines
child poverty policies, employment policies, and setting an overall agenda for poverty policy.

Rhetoric 114 Rhetoric of New Media
  • MW 4-5:30
  • Winnie Wong
  • 156 Dwinelle
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 77890

This course examines a range of digital media practices including hypertext, interactive drama, videogames, literary interactive fiction, and socially constructed narratives in multi-user spaces. Through a mixture of readings, discussion, and project work, we will explore the theoretical positions, debates, and design issues arising from these different practices. Topics will include the rhetorical, ludic, theatrical, narrative political, and legal dimensions of digital media.

Sociology 127 Development and Globalization
  • TTH 11-12:30
  • Thomas Gold
  • A1 Hearst Annex
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 81834

Development and globalization are terms that frequently come up in political debates over the economy, rising unemployment, poverty and inequality to name just a few.
But, what do these words mean? These terms, or at least the phenomena that they represent, are contested. In this course we will consider the various debates over development and globalization from post-WWII to
the present, how the global economy and relationships between and within nations have changed during this period, the actors involved in shaping the nature of this change, and the social and environmental
impacts of the prevailing way of conceiving of and structuring development and globalization.

Sociology 146 AC Contemporary Immigration in Global Perspective
  • MWF 11-12
  • Irene Bloemraad
  • 210 Wheeler
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 81867

Immigration is once again transforming the United States, but also the European nations that used to send migrants to the US, oil-rich Middle Eastern states and developing nations. How do we understand these transformations, and what does it mean for the future? The class is divided into three parts. (1) MIGRATION: Why do people migrate across international borders? Can states control migration, especially “unwanted” migrants? (2) INTEGRATION: How do sociologists model, evaluate and theorize immigrant “assimilation?” In what ways are foreign “outsiders” and their children becoming integrated, or excluded, in their new homes? What is the effect on the countries that receive them? (3) BELONGING: What are the contours of membership in a world of migration? How does immigration affect notions of belonging, nationality, and social cohesion? This class is open to anyone with an interest in immigration.

Sociology 151 Personality and Social Structure
  • MWF 9-10
  • Claude Fischer
  • 2 Leconte
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 81879

This course addresses how individual psyches are shaped by the wider society – how persons’ locations in a culture, and historical era, and within a society affect how they think, what they feel, and how they express their personalities. Among the specific topics we will look at are Asian versus Western ways of thinking, class differences in the sense of control, historical changes in “intelligence,” and variations in happiness. Two section meetings a week. Note: This course has been chosen to have a GSI who will focus on developing student skills in writing sociology papers. The course requirements will involve multiple “grading opportunities,” including short exams and short papers.